North Fort Bend Water Authority Notice of Preliminary 2019 Fees

Please see the attached Notice of Preliminary 2019 Fees from the North Fort Bend Water Authority (the “NFBWA”), stating that the NFBWA intends to increase its mandated surface water fee from $3.70 per 1,000 gallons, to $4.00 per 1,000 gallons, effective January 1, 2019. This fee, reflected as a separate line item on your water bill, is paid directly to the NFBWA and is used to design, build and operate new infrastructure, which delivers surface water to your district.

The Notice states that the NFBWA expects to discuss the surface water fee and adopt its 2019 budget at its December Board of Directors meeting.

For more information about the NFBWA, please visit:

http://www.nfbwa.com

Water Irrigation System Evaluation ( W.I.S.E. Guys Residential Program )

The W.I.S.E. Guys residential program is a free, no obligations, water conservation service currently being offered to Fort Bend County Municipal Utility District No. 146 residents through water conservation initiatives offered by the North Fort Bend Water Authority (NFBWA).  NFBWA created a program called Larry’s Toolbox to incentivize MUDs to conserve water. This program consists of nine (9) initiatives, all worth a set number of points, and if a MUD participates in enough initiatives to receive a minimum number of points, they will receive a discounted water rate the following year.  The W.I.S.E. Guys residential program is just one of the nine (9) initiatives offered to MUDs by NFBWA.  Currently, the District only needs to have nine (9) more residential water irrigation system evaluations performed by District residents to receive the achievable points available for this initiative.

The purpose of this program is to evaluate existing residential irrigation systems and make recommendations for improvements to the performance of the system and to the scheduling of the controller to eliminate unnecessary waste. The program allows for a licensed irrigator/representative to provide face-to-face education to the homeowner on efficient irrigation and proper controller scheduling which in turn will eliminate unnecessary waste and allow for residents to save money on their water bills. You are not required to make any adjustments or repairs to your system.

The W.I.S.E. Guys representative will not make any repairs to the system as part of the evaluation. The W.I.S.E Guys representative will only make the recommended adjustments to the system controller if the customer allows such adjustments. In many instances, the adjustment to the system controller is the first step to water conservation and cost savings.  The homeowner is under no obligation to hire the W.I.S.E. Guys representative to repair the problems found within their system.

Click the following link to the North Fort Bend Water Authority’s website to register:  http://www.vepollc.com/wise_request_gis.aspx?wid=1035.  Your application will be assigned to an approved W.I.S.E. Guys contractor who will contact you within seven (7) days to schedule an evaluation.

Please share this information about the W.I.S.E. Guys program with your friends and neighbors in Fort Bend County M.U.D. No. 146.

Checking for Irrigation System Leaks

Are your water bills too high?  The most common outdoor leaks found around a home occur with the irrigation system.  Most homeowners catch indoor leaks quickly, but outdoor leaks can be harder to find, especially with your irrigation system.

A typical irrigation system consists of a backflow prevention device, piping, valves, sprinkler heads or emitters and a controller.  Performing irrigation troubleshooting checks to determine if you have a leak or malfunctioning system can help you conserve water and save money.

Irrigation Controller Check

Controllers, themselves, don’t leak water. What they are is an electrical clock that tells the sprinkler valves when to release water through the sprinklers and for how long. What you’re checking for when you look at the controller is to make sure that the programming is reasonable. Sometimes, for whatever reason, an irrigation program (collection of sprinkler zones under one program) loses its programming, maybe due to loss of power, and goes on default, which may be the totally wrong schedule for your area.  Routinely checking your controller’s programming and time clock can ensure you are watering at the appropriate time of day, times per week and for the right amount of time.

Sprinkler Valves Check

Locate and check each of your valve boxes. Are they flooded or dry? They should be dry. If they’re wet, and it hasn’t been raining, check them carefully for worn parts, loose wiring, or water leaking out between fittings. Using irrigation flags to note problem locations is helpful in assessing all your systems issues.

If you are doing the repairs yourself, estimate and purchase the parts you will need and make the repairs all at once, before going on to test the rest of the system.  If you are not making repairs yourself, you might want to start a list of the problems you find for your landscaper or plumber to take care of and leave the flags in place so the contractor you choose can quickly go right to the problem areas.

Sprinkler Stations Check

Once the controller and valves have been tested, it’s time to start checking sprinklers. If you have a large yard and numerous landscaped areas, you may need the help of another person – one to stay at or near the controller to turn stations on and off, the other to walk around the sprinklers, as they come on, and take notes. The walker should also be carrying irrigation flags to mark whatever problems they find for later repair.

Turn the stations on one by one. You will be looking for several indications of wasted water:

  • Water geysers – which indicate missing sprayheads.
  • Floods around the base of a sprinkler – grass may need to be cut shorter or a short riser replaced with a taller one. Also, could be an old valve that is not shutting off properly. You might want to check the valve that supplies that sprinkler again.
  • Misaligned sprayhead – shoots water into a nearby obstruction or over the sidewalk or driveway, instead of grass. Technically not a leak, the sprayhead just needs to be realigned.
  • Water spurts in the space between sprinkler heads – indicating a broken pipe (lateral line) that has already blown out the soil above it.
  • Flooded areas between sprinklers – can indicate a slow, steady leak in a lateral line underground. You will have to dig down to find the actual spot.
  • Spurts of water at the base of a sprinkler – indicating a broken seal where the nozzle or riser meets the supply line beneath.

All these problems commonly occur when you have an irrigated yard and landscape beds, however, they are easy to address with a bit of education and some patience.  They also need to be checked for and fixed on a regular basis – at least once a month.  Routine maintenance, in itself, will save you water and overtime, money!

Once all the stations have been checked and repairs made, you can test your irrigation system against your water meter to ensure that all leaks have been addressed (see website article on “How to Read Your Water Meter.”)

For homeowners that prefer assistance with irrigation system checks, the District offers a free program called W.I.S.E. Guys (Water Irrigation System Evaluation).  The purpose of this program is to evaluate existing residential irrigation systems and make recommendations for improvements to the performance of the system and to the scheduling of the controller to eliminate unnecessary waste. The program allows for a licensed irrigator/representative to provide face-to-face education to the homeowner on efficient irrigation and proper controller scheduling which in turn will eliminate unnecessary waste and allow for residents to save money on their water bills. You are not required to make any adjustments or repairs to your system.

To take advantage of this free irrigation system evaluation program click on the following link to get started:  http://www.nfbwa.com/conservation/wiseguys/.

How to Read Your Water Meter

As a homeowner, there are several reasons why it is helpful to be able to locate and read your water meter. First, you can determine just how much water you use in a day. As an example, by reading your meter at the beginning and the end of a day you can compare the two reads and tell how much water you and your family used that day.

Another helpful tool in understanding your meter reading is to detect leaks early. If you turn off all faucets and any equipment that uses water in your home, look at your meter and the leak indicator or low flow indicator is still turning, then you have a leak somewhere. The speed at which the indicator is turning determines how large the leak is. Here are some tips to help you find and read your water meter.

Your water meter is generally located near the curb in front of your home close to the sidewalk. For a corner lot it may be on the side of your home. Water meters are typically housed in a concrete or plastic box that may be marked “water” (as shown in the above photo). Carefully remove the lid by using a tool such as a large screwdriver or pliers. Look out for “creepy crawlies” that may be using your meter box as their home!

The picture below shows the water meter face and how to read the meter register. For specific information on rates, billing information and FAQ’s call EDP at 832-467-1599 or visit EDP’s website at: http://www.edpwater.com and look for the link to FB MUD 146. The FAQ page has great information!

Residential Outdoor Water Leaks or Sewer Problems

Fort Bend County Municipal Utility District NO. 146 (the District) provides water and wastewater services to the District’s approximately 1700 residential connections through Environmental Development Partners (EDP), a professional water utility operator providing services throughout the greater Houston area. EDP has been providing service to the District since 2012.

Residents that experience any type of outdoor leak or sewer problem at their home are encouraged to call EDP prior to contacting a plumber to help avoid unnecessary repairs or expenditures. EDP’s professional and experienced staff is available to assist residents and help diagnose those emergency issues 24 / 7.

Other routine services such as paying your water bill or setting up new water service can be addressed online at EDP’s website: http://www.edpwater.com/.

If you have an outside leak or sewer problem, call the District before calling a plumber. We are here to help 24/7.

The customer service telephone number is (832) 467-1599. You can also email your non-emergency questions/ comments to: CUSTOMERSERVICE@EDPWATER.COM.