The Scoop on Poop!

Did you know the Environmental Protection Agency estimates that just 3 days’ worth of dog waste from 100 dogs can contribute enough bacteria to temporarily close a bay and all watershed area to swimming or shell fishing within 20 miles? You may think “I’m not planning to drink or eat shellfish out of Oyster Creek”, but Oyster Creek flows into the Brazos River which then empties into the Gulf of Mexico. Many communities now draw water for drinking out of the Brazos River and millions of people along the Gulf Coast and the nation eat fish and shellfish caught in the Gulf of Mexico.

According to LiveScience, approximately 40% of dog owners claim they don’t pick up their pets poop for a variety of reasons (lazy, don’t feel like it, small dog=small waste, etc.), but the main reason is they think the poop will eventually go away. Although the poop will eventually break down on its own, it can take a long time. Once the poop has broken down, it doesn’t mean the bacteria and parasites disappear. Other animals and humans can be exposed to these pathogens directly or it eventually gets washed into storm sewers or Oyster Creek and enters the surface water system.

Environmental Concerns

When pet waste is left behind, it gets washed into storm drains and creeks by the rain. From there, unlike the separate sanitary sewer system that collects wastewater in your home from your sink, toilet and other appliances, water and other substances deposited in storm drains head straight to local rivers, lakes and bays with no filtering or cleaning. As pet waste goes through the chemical process of decomposition, it uses up large amounts of oxygen in the water. This oxygen reduction is harmful and sometimes fatal to many aquatic species. In addition, the process by which the pet waste is broken down produces by-products that encourage weed and algae growth, which also can be detrimental to aquatic and marine life. Stories of fish kills from algae blooms come to mind.

Health Concerns

One pound of dog waste can contain 10.5 billion fecal coliform bacteria. The average dog excretes .75 lbs. of waste per day—or 274 lbs. of waste per year. As you can see, dog waste is a very significant host of bacteria, and those bacteria can be harmful to human health if the waste is not disposed of appropriately. Some of the more common diseases caused by pet waste are Campylobacteriosis, Cryptosporidium, Toxocariasis, Toxoplasmosis and Salmonellosis. And it is not just bacteria—dog waste sometimes contains parasites, too, which can include hookworms, roundworms, whipworms, tapeworms and giardiasis. Oh, by the way, dog waste is a major food source for rats, which brings the health concern to a whole other level. It should be no surprise now that pet waste can create serious health concerns!

What to do with Pet Waste

We can pretty much gather by now that simply leaving pet waste where it lies is not an acceptable solution. The best way to deal with pet waste is to collect it and flush it down your toilet so that it undergoes the same treatment as human waste from your home. The next best option is to collect the waste and dispose of it in biodegradable bags along with your other garbage. If no biodegradable bags are available, collect it in a plastic bag and dispose of it in the same manner.

What not to do with Pet Waste

Under no circumstances should pet waste be dumped into storm sewers, as that only hastens its trip to the waterways and oceans. Because of all the bacteria that can be contained in pet waste, it should never be used in compost piles or for fertilizer in gardens. It takes chemicals or extreme heat to kill the bacteria and parasites found in dog waste and composting generally does not generate enough heat.

One of the leading sources of water pollution in communities across America is entirely preventable and can be completely eliminated overnight. Dog owners simply need to take responsibility and pick up after their pets.

So, let’s not only be healthy and environmentally conscious neighbors, let’s be considerate, respectful neighbors and pick up after our pets. After all, it’s the right thing to do.

Reforestation Program – Oyster Creek Greenbelt and The Nature Preserve Initiative

In November 2016, the Parks Committee and the Board of Directors approved a program that allows residents living adjacent to the Oyster Creek Greenbelt and the Nature Preserve, a mechanism to install new trees in these District common areas.  At the request of the residents living adjacent to these areas and the recreational users of these common areas, the Parks Committee developed a program whereas residents can pay for the purchase and installation of a native tree in a location mutually agreeable to the resident and the District. So far over 31 trees have been planted through this program. Because of the interest in this program, the District is extending it for the Fall 2020 planting. Orders will be taken through October with planting sometime in mid-November.

The purpose of the Reforestation Program is:

  • To provide individual residents the opportunity to install a tree behind their home
  • To promote the installation of new native trees along the greenbelt to ensure a native population of varying maturity
  • To educate the community regarding the positive environmental impacts of reforestation
  • To preserve property values
  • To enhance the quality of life for recreational users of the OCG and the Nature Preserve
  • To maintain or enhance wildlife habitat
  • To sequester carbon dioxide

For pricing or to place your request please contact us at http://www.fbmud146.org/contact/ or by calling 281-306-0206.

Weather Alert – Tropical Storm Beta

Tropical Storm Beta is projected to make landfall near Matagorda Bay late Monday evening or early Tuesday morning, with tropical storm force winds being felt along the Texas coast as early as today (Sunday). The storm is a slow-moving storm that could produce a long duration rain fall event creating the potential for local street and flash flooding.

Fortunately, Fort Bend County is better prepared for a disaster than many other Counties in the nation. It only takes one catastrophic event impacting the Houston area to cause damage to your home or business. Fort Bend County Municipal Utility District NO. 146 (FBCMUD146) wants to help our community stay informed and prepare for the unexpected by providing you with information and useful resources that can assist you in your efforts. On the District’s website you will find numerous links to emergency preparedness websites and phone numbers that will help you not only plan for an event, but help you stay abreast of the event as it unfolds.

So please visit our website at www.FBMUD146.org and let us help you stay safe and prepared. Also visit the Fort Bend County Homeland Security and Emergency Management website to receive the latest emergency updates or sign-up for alerts from Fort Bend County.

August and September are peak months of hurricane season, which officially last from June 1st to November 30th annually.

Weather Alert

Tropical storm Laura has entered the Gulf of Mexico and will quickly intensify into hurricane strength today. Fortunately, Fort Bend County is better prepared for a disaster than many other Counties in the nation. It only takes one catastrophic event impacting the Houston area to cause damage to your home or business. Fort Bend County Municipal Utility District NO. 146 (FBCMUD146) wants to help our community stay informed and prepare for the unexpected by providing you with information and useful resources that can assist you in your efforts. On the District’s website you will find numerous links to emergency preparedness websites and phone numbers that will help you not only plan for an event, but help you stay abreast of the event as it unfolds.

So please visit our website at www.FBMUD146.org and let us help you stay safe and prepared. Also visit https://fbcoem.org/ to receive the latest emergency updates or sign-up for alerts from Fort Bend County.

August and September are peak months of hurricane season, which officially last from June 1st to November 30th annually.

2020 Hurricane Names

Authur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gonzalo
Hanna
Isaias
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paulette
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred

Emergency Preparedness Resources

Fort Bend County Office of Emergency Management
http://www.fbcoem.org/go/doc/1528/2616214

Fort Bend County Emergency Alerts & Notifications
http://www.fbcoem.org/go/doc/1528/506723

Emergency Preparedness Essentials
http://www.emergencypreparednessessentials.org

American Red Cross
http://www.redcross.org

Harris County Regional Joint Information Center – Register for Local Weather Alerts
http://www.readyharris.org

Harris County Flood Control District Storm Center – Flood Preparedness Planning
https://www.hcfcd.org/storm-center

National Weather Service
http://www.weather.gov

Harris County Flood Warning System – Rainfall Totals
http://www.harriscountyfws.org

Houston TranStar – Traffic Information
https://traffic.houstontranstar.org/layers

Harris County Flood Control District – Bayous and Creek Levels
https://www.hcfcd.org

Federal Disaster Assistance
https://www.disasterassistance.gov

Find My Towed Car – Locating a Vehicle after a Flood
http://findmytowedcar.com/tvrmscitizen/mainpage.aspx

National Flood Insurance Program
https://www.floodsmart.gov/floodsmart

National Weather Service Hurricane Tracking Center
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov